2011-09-17

ÜberGøgl

How does one ask google to find out if there's a technical term for the practice of deliberately leaving struck-out text in place?

There are probably two cases

  • in proof-reading, a need to see prior versions the history of the text.
  • in rhetoric, to pretend to hide an insult in praise

It's specifically the second rhetorical use I'm after. There's clearly no need for it. Technology has eliminated that. Why leave the 'uncorrected text' when you can just delete or reword without trace? Leaving it behind can only be to make a point, to amuse or to otherwise mess with the reader's brain.

And that's why the Ancient Greeks were invented, to provide us with those classy classical Greek terms like anacoluthon and catachresis. But it seemed unlikely I'm going to find one, principally because they didn't have this kind of technology.

But we practiced such nonsense^h^h^h^h^h^h^h^hdeceptions on teletypes before we could tracelessly remove text. We're not likely to see old stone carvings visibly showing explicit 'control h' (or some ancient equivalent of a carved mark for backspace delete). But there are many documents (including ones cast in stone) with visible corrections or amendments. Doubtless some deliberately left more unhidden than they strictly needed to be.

So the Greeks probably did have a word for it. But what is it? Are there any examples out there? And how do you ask google?

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